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Photographers Working with Opposing Visions, from Holographs to Cyanotypes

A diverse range of unusually young photographers are reflecting on the reality of creating images in a world of extremes.

Ivan Forde, “Reflection” (2016), on display at De Soto Gallery (image courtesy of De Soto Gallery)
Ivan Forde, “Reflection” (2016), on display at De Soto Gallery (image courtesy of De Soto Gallery)

Checking in at the front desk of The Photography Show, presented by the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD), the loud bark of a sweet Labrador, doubling as a security dog, set the room noticeably on edge. “You never know, it’s a crazy world,” a good-natured attendant remarked. In such divisive times, one thing we can agree on seems to be that the world has, in fact, gone crazy.

The Photography Show presented by AIPAD, April 4-7, Pier 94, (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic, except where otherwise noted)
The Photography Show presented by AIPAD, April 4-7, Pier 94, (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic, except where otherwise noted)

At this year’s show — running through the weekend at Pier 94 — you’ll find a diverse range of unusually young photographers reflecting on the reality of creating images in a world of extremes. Hyper-digital processes compete with techniques popularized in the 19th century, and caught between these opposing visions are a handful of photographers taking solace in timeless expressions of everyday life.

Terri Loewenthal, “Psychscape 06” (Gold Lake, CA) (2017), on display at Jackson Fine Art
Terri Loewenthal, “Psychscape 06” (Gold Lake, CA) (2017), on display at Jackson Fine Art

The psychedelic landscapes of Terri Loewenthal at Jackson Fine Art recall a time before Instagram, when Holga-induced light leaks created the distorted world we always craved. Capturing the rolling mountain ranges and sparkling oceans of California, these Psychscapes question everything from traditional landscape photography to Instagram effects like Lo-Fi and Vignette. Delving further into a world of artificial saturation, the works of the French photographer Reine Paradis at Galerie Catherine et André Hug are clearly influenced by a post-Instagram world. Storyboarding her locations before shooting humorous fashion-meets-lifestyle stills, she reduces her images to a tri-color, neon palette. In depictions of a two-dimensional fantasy life, cyan palm trees, cobalt swimming pools, and neon green airplanes critique jet-setter aspirations.

Read on HERE >>> Source: Hyperallergic Photographers Working with Opposing Visions, from Holographs to Cyanotypes

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